HIGH QUALITY SCIENTIFIC CONTENT,  ONLINE OPEN ACCESS,  GLOBAL SCIENTIFIC AUDIENCE,  COST EFFECTIVE, ANY ONE CAN DOWNLOAD REPRINTS 
Spreading knowledge

Google Scholar

Google Scholar

Archives

Back 

PREVALENCE OF DIFFERENT GENOTYPES/SUBGENOTYPES AND PRECORE MUTATIONS IN CHRONICALLY INFECTED HEPATITIS B VIRUS ISOLATES OF HARYANA IN NORTH INDIA. Vikas Pahal, Jasbir Singh

PREVALENCE OF DIFFERENT GENOTYPES/SUBGENOTYPES AND PRECORE MUTATIONS IN CHRONICALLY INFECTED HEPATITIS B VIRUS ISOLATES OF HARYANA IN NORTH INDIA.

Vikas Pahal, Jasbir Singh

International Journal of Applied Microbiology Science 2014; 3(2):1-14

Abstract

An association between the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes with the disease outcomes has been suggested by the various reports throughout the world. Secondly, Precore mutations known to be linked to either these genotypes or disease status could have an impact on the progression and severity of liver disease. These types of information’s are scanty from India. Our aim was to find out the prevalence of indigenous genotypes/subgenotypes and precore mutations of HBV and their association with clinical outcomes of the disease. A total 174 patients with chronic HBV infection were enrolled in the present study. Patients were divided into four different clinical stages: chronic asymptomatic carriers, chronic symptomatic carriers with or without Hepatitis B virus ‘e’ antigen (HBeAg) marker, acute cases and hepatocellular carcinoma cases (HCC). Genotype specific primers and nested PCR-RFLP assay were used for detection of circulating genotypes in the HBV infected population. Precore region (nts. 1763-1966) was amplified using nested PCR reactions and direct sequenced to analyze the presence of various mutations. Genotype D (64.0%) was found to be the most prevalent genotype in our HBV infected population, followed by A (33.0%), B (2.0%) and F (1.0%) genotype. No correlation was observed between genotypes and HBV related disease status. Phylogenetic analysis of PreS1/S gene region revealed the presence of subgenotypes A1, B1, D1, D2 and F2 in our HBV infected population. Precore mutations like 1858(C/T), 1862(T/G), 1888(G/A), 1896(A), 1915(A/T/G) were observed in our chronic isolates. These mutations were observed significantly more often with a particular genotype or disease group. Further, 2 isolates from our study showed the presence of naturally occurring vaccine escape mutation (GlnHis replacement mutation) at amino acid position 129 of PreS1/S protein, which is a serious concern.

Key words: Genotype, HBeAg, HBV, HCC, precore mutations, RFLP, subgenotype.
Attachments:
Time to create page: 0.15 seconds


Copyright © All rights reserved Science Instinct Publications sciipub.com