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MICROORGANISMS AND GLOBAL WARMING.A Pathak, R Pathak

MICROORGANISMS AND GLOBAL WARMING.

A Pathak, R Pathak

International Journal of Applied Microbiology Science 2012; 1; 21-23.
Abstract

More carbon dioxide in the atmosphere causes soil to release the potent greenhouse gases methane and nitrous oxide. This feedback to our changing atmosphere means that nature is not as efficient in slowing global warming as we previously thought. Bacteria and viruses would get their sources to keep living, and they will not care going through us to succeed. It’s an ecological point and counterpoint: “the more the plants soak up CO2, the more microbes release these more potent greenhouse gases” The microbial counterpoint is only partial, “reducing the cooling effect of plants by about 20 percent.” The only thing left to say is that we need to keep in mind that our actions are not just affecting the human race; it is also affecting Mother Nature. Hopefully we are not too late to make a big difference to make our future better.

Keywords Global warming, climate change, microorganisms.
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